Posts Categorised: Value

Pep talk

Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Fashion
  • Value
  • Pep&Co became the new kid on the block in the UK high street discount market in July 2015. The business sells a range of clothing and homewares, and on opening had ambitious plans – outlining the potential for the brand to be the ‘George of the high street’ and having an aggressive store opening strategy

    Go your own way

    Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Value
  • Discounters appear to have enjoyed a bumper Christmas this year with record footfall boosting overall performance: B&M saw sales rise 7.2%, while Aldi enjoyed revenue growth of 15%.
    In some ways, this could be the calm before the storm for the sector, with dark clouds rapidly approaching. While the looming impact of Brexit and threat

    Tiger burning bright

    Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Home
  • Value
  • Flying Tiger Copenhagen, which until its recent name change was called ‘Tiger’, is one of the top 10 fastest growing retailers in the UK and their success begs the question: is the face of value retailing changing? And if so, what’s driving this change?
    We believe their success lies in having a modern, IKEA-esque environment, which encourages browsing and

    Billion dollar baby

    Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Value
  • As Poundland is now offering a selection of products priced up to £30, what are the implications for discounters in the UK?
    We believe a lot can be learned from how US dollar store retailers have recently adapted their offer.
    Dollar store retailers began in the US in the early 1900s, soon after the emergence

    Battle loyal

    Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Value
  • Loyalty is a bond that can be strengthened, weakened or broken. It is forward-looking and asks ‘will you keep coming back to us?’.
    In the consumer world, loyalty grew as a phenomenon whereby repeat business was bought at a price, with regular customers reaping rewards through a wallet full of loyalty cards. The problem was

    This year’s Black Friday was the UK’s biggest yet, with consumers spending £1.1bn on the day, up 35% on 2014 according to Experian. However, despite this boost, the BRC’s latest figures show that November’s retail sales grew at their weakest pace since 2011, with most of the Black Friday halo felt online.
    As the trend

    That’s how much was generated in the first 90 minutes of China’s newly famed Singles’ Day. By way of comparison, the four day period of Black Friday through Cyber Monday in the US last year generated $6.6 billion in total.
    Pioneered by Alibaba, “double eleven” was first established in 2009 to provide retail therapy to

    Last year, Black Friday made its entrance on to the UK stage. The burning question now on industry analysts’ lips is whether UK retailers should ignore or embrace this latest US phenomenon. With 10% of people looking to do the bulk of their Christmas shopping on Black Friday this year (November 27) – a figure

    Christmas is now all about the `feel-good factor’. It begins with a rallying cry from the market’s largest players: Coca Cola, M&S, Boots and of course John Lewis, providing emotionally-laden Christmas adverts, and is followed by a series of events leading up to the big day: Christmas markets, Winter Wonderlands, Christmas Jumper Day, the

    Chinese takeaway

    Author: Pragma / Categories:
  • Value
  • For those who think the global market is a one-size fits all situation, they’ll quickly be proven wrong in China. A successfully executed entrance into China requires a deep understanding of Chinese consumer behaviour and a highly localised strategy. When a cookie-cutter model from the west is implemented, failure is often imminent.
    Western brands unsuccessful